Cantandum in Ezkhaton 03/24/19

I’m on the road and finishing this by mobile phone. Feedly was not behaving well with WordPress, so if any of the links are broken do me a favour and let me know by comment.

Malcolm starts the week, writing on support for nuclear energy — Renewable Energy: Fraud and Folly. Followed by a model of the world economy, based on migration restrictions. Plus, two takes on the Christchurch shootings, here and the other here.

Clarissa notes an NR article on parents using their children for political expression. In my practice, I’ve worked with lots of millennial students who are gifted and smart (the LSAT selects for that). They are all great kids. But they’ve got no ‘adulting’ skills. They avoid conflict like it was a school bus full of plague infested fleas. It’s clear the adults in their lives prepared them not at all to deal with real people in conflict. I suspect their parents wanted them to remain children (the article posits a reason for this). I think it’s a leading cause of why so many (50%ish) leave Law within 5 years. My posts last year on Law School Lessons not Taught were a first try to coherently explain what new law students need to learn, besides what’s on the syllabus, in the face of bad ‘adulting’ lessons.

The Orthosphere with an inspiring interpretation of Edmund Spencer’s The Faerie Queen.

VDH on Presidents he would not vote for.

PA blog on Trump’s Numbers. Also, Two Fine Things, with one being braids on the ladies. Just under the wire, Part I of Two Nightsongs.

Alf on the Fear in the Eyes of the Elite. Also, what is the Right, and how does it best deal with the left.

Audacious Epigone on religious service attendance and happiness.

Missed from last week: Guillaume Durocher on woke immigration policy in Italy. Well worth an RTWT.

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Triumph of St. Thomas Aquinas over Averroes, Benozzo Gozzoli

Mr. Briggs starts the week with the ongoing translation of Summa Theologica, his Summary Against Modern Thought: God and Natural Effects. Also, when is a theory true? On the usefulness of trolley-car thought experiments in the Power To Kill Without Detection. He speaks on a distinction I did not appreciate before: There Are No Such Thing As Gays (Or Trannies). Ask not for whom the bell tolls. It tolls for Statistical Significance. Plus, a failed argument against free will. To finish his busy week: This Week In Doom – We Are All Seattle Now Edition.

A troubling report from a survivor of the non-binary trans-gender industry.

Steve Sailer on the anti-Semitism in the Enlightenment.

The Scholar’s Stage on Tolkien’s Heroes.

The Agenda is becoming clear (courtesy of Clarissa): on sovereignty, Part I and Part II, and on terrorism; further, on the One Party System, here and continued here.

In Canada, the Left eating its own devolves to cowbirding.

Spandrel on Acceleration by Yang. Please RTWT.

Evolutionist X on instinctual spring cleaning. Thoughts on the purpose of music: Feel Something (or someone). Also, on tribalism as a really ancient anti-predation mechanism.

“Bad” Billy Pratt at Kill to Party with Chasing Ghosts. The quote that matters: “The world has moved beyond sincerity.” Mein Herz Brennt.

Anatoly Karlin on Kazakhstan and Nazarbayev’s resignation. Not a bad article on how to implement nationalism. Also, excellent comment (#37) courtesy of the same:

I have often thought that Hitler was a strange psycho character who was out of place in his time. He was a vegetarian, fanatically committed to recycling, with an ambiguous gender identity, no kids, and he really hated Russia. Today he would fit right in with the liberal progressives marching around and yelling about the coming end of the world and how Russia has to be destroyed. Timing in life is everything, today’s Hitler might chain himself to a power plant to stop global warming, storm a farm that ‘abuses’ animals, change his gender at will, and – of course – start a war with Russia.

American Sun on American historiography of Russia. On why some massacres have more staying power than others. Foucault viewed from the Right. Also, a great article: Flight 98 Redux. A taste:

Most people would likely shake their heads at this point and argue that I am being dramatic, that things are not really that bad. America is wealthy and people are relatively safe. If such metrics are the measure of the goodness or badness of a nation, then I would not disagree. On the other hand, I flatly reject these stipulations. In fact, the measures used to gauge America’s modern success (GDP, market stability, inflation rate, employment rate) are merely the factors needed to maintain an economy of scale. We have all been convinced over time that spreadsheet economics is the measure of national health. So long as the average citizen gets a marginal crumb of the year over year growth, then the political climate will remain relatively stable.

Finishing the week: Five Friday Reads.

The Anti-Gnostic with an interesting post on the lack of scarcity and current politics.

Throne, Altar, Liberty on why you should repent for your good deeds. Bonus entry: What Came First, Gospel or Law?

Under ‘One I’ve Been Saving’ or ‘When YouTube Recommendations Actually Pay Off’: A great video from Sir Roger Scruton and the BBC on Why Beauty Matters.
Also, a highly recommended deep dive on the subject:

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Z-Man on the lie of democracy. His take on Esoteric Political Language. The Future of Media, which in Canada is heading towards appeasing [The Current Year] Party to survive. Plus, new technology, same old Oligopoly.

Also, politics as drama. I have to agree. From my perch here it seems as if the Left v. Right distinction is artificial and the outcomes of their battles largely determined. I say this because in my current career, I’ve noticed politics heats up whenever kids are in school. The moment the masses have time off, political controversies cease. I do understand that the politicians are also away, so there is little going on that might cause controversy. But a total vacuum? I strongly suspect that such controversies are reported because someone needs it to sell a story or papers, or get clicks. Such stories are not in demand during vacation/holiday times, so they don’t get made. The controversies are left in inventory for another market cycle. I already know such stories are selected to support a narrative. But I also feel like someone is metering the release of such stories so it keeps enough attention focused on the producers to maximize profits. In short, we get a supply of political conflict stories to keep us glued to the screen. I’m speaking of Canada here. Not sure if my readers notice the same.

Lastly, America, take a bow. Thanks, you make this possible after the worst winter in forty years:

Keep on reactin’ too.

Señor Blanco

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