Cantandum in Ezkhaton 03/31/19

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Bronze Age Pervert makes a guest appearance at American Sun: Old and New Paganism. RTWT. Also, interesting thoughts on UBI and Amazon dorms. Always an excellent way to end the week: Five Friday Reads. Further, the real estate woes of Boomers.

Jussie Smollet > SNC Lavalin – prosecutors let him off the hook. Steve Sailer: Jussie Smollet walks. Some perps are more equal than others. Although, I’ll offer this translation of Leftese: “getting on with my/his/her life” means “I/he/she would really like to avoid any icky consequences.” Second City Cop asks: Who Benefits? Audacious Epigone on Candace Owen’s response.

Z-Man on the sources of the decline of social trust. To quote:

In the 1980’s, people generally thought most Democrats wanted to improve the lives of the working class and most Republicans wanted to protect the middle class. The media, while biased, had lots of people trying hard to get the facts to the public. Big business may have been motivated by greed, but most people in business were decent people. People who doubted everything were conspiracy nuts, who wore aluminum foil hats. 1980’s man would be astonished to see that only total fools trust anything in the public domain.

I remember those days…what the hell happened? Were we able to discuss things publicly without filtering it through ideology? Or has nothing changed, and the Internet has just shown us all how very deluded we are?

GA Blog with the Central Imaginary…on the concept of this central authority who should fix everything.

Mr. Briggs commences with his weekly Summary Against Modern Thought. Also, on the incoherence of the NYT’s ‘God is incoherent’ argument. How to confirm theories non-empirically. Followed up by an argument against the multiverse. A way to cure the higher education blues: Independent Ratings of University Degrees. Plus, some much needed good news: The Spirit World Is Alive and Well and Surrounds Us. He finishes the week with This Week In Doom – Fly the Woke Skies Edition.

Nightsongs, Part 2 of 2 from PA Blog. Also, a great post about being tested – and readiness for battle.

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Obligatory CUTE Asian girl picture. That’s right, I went there.

Steve Sailer asks us all to stop saying Asian girls are cute! Also, his take on the SPLC’s recent issues.

Malcolm also presents words as living fossils. Followed up by Racist Thing #107, which I think makes mayonnaise a microaggression.

Jim analyzes a Chinese TV show.

Alf on the difficulties of starting a new religion. Also, thoughts on what we offer: the RedWhite Pill.

Z-Man on the fountain of conspiracy theories from the Left. His podcast for the week — a grab bag. Also, why dissident political movements are failing. An excellent case for bringing back the hangman. Also, on how to dissent: Welcome to the Resistance.

Evolutionist X starts with a quick note on jobs and education. Onto a discussion, What Happens To a Nation Defeated, in particular, the Comanches. Also, society and how our perception of it has changed in What is a Society?

The Orthosphere on that Fellaheen Feeling, a grand disregard for the grandeur or decadance of civilization.

Clarissa…filed under ‘hmmm’.

On Estonian efforts to put AI in their legal system. I’d advise against that, given those colluding Russians. Oh, wait…

Lastly, Malcolm on the Mueller Report, and Andrew McCarthy’s reactions, with a follow up. No surprises for me, either in the report or the Dem/Left reaction. They’ve got way too much invested in that hoax to just let it go. Clarissa’s thoughts on the matter. Lord Black of Crossharbour offers his take, and also chides Canada for buying in. Newfoundland’s Rex Murphy opines with outrage. Z-Man on the end of the cult of Russia-Trump collusion. Al Fin on Spygate, underlying the hoax. Is this Schadenfreude, a victory march, or both:

Keep on reactin’

Señor Blanco.

Magic

I’ve recently come to see the practice of law in a different light. Lawyers are wizards. They say magic spells, and the truth is altered, the weight of facts changes, and circumstances otherwise fictional are magically deemed to exist. People must obey the resulting order.
Take for instance, matrimonial property law in Alberta. On divorce the couple’s property is deemed to be held equally by each partner (although this can be altered by agreement). Was this the agreement they signed up for? It depends, as the law in this area changes every once in a while, so the state of the law when you got married is likely not what it is when you get divorced. But somehow, we sign a few documents and (sometimes) say a few phrases before a judge (the meaning of which may as well be Latin for the clients hearing them), and the statute magically realigns property ownership in an instant. It’s like watching a Harry Potter movie (Harry Potter and the Praecipe to Note In Default gets my vote).
Not married? Don’t worry, most provinces have rules which apply to common law relationships as well. In Alberta, if you sleep with your room mate regularly, you may be magically deemed to be in a common law relationship.
Suppose you fall through the cracks. The Supreme Court of Canada came up with the remedy of Constructive Trust to make sure the disadvantaged (perhaps) spouse (deemed to be) gets their fair share (also deemed) of property held by the other partner. (The Australian High Court had very unkind words about Canadian Law on this particular point.)
The whole saying magic phrases does not bother me so much. English (and subsequently Canadian) common law became complicated with many abstract concepts, so I’m not surprised by the esoteric jargon. But I am concerned that the law seems to spend a great deal of time deeming things to be the case which otherwise, in fact, simply are not. And creating legal fictions which both sides to the dispute would never agree was the case.
See, in the old days, clients used to come to lawyers looking for a proper, fair and just determination. Now, the language has shifted, and clients come looking for what they can get. It used to be about redressing wrongs by common long-standing and well tested standards. Now it’s about what I can get (or get away with). More and more, what you can get is determined by statute, not common law. And so to me, (outside of pure contract disputes) the law has become about wealth redistribution at the behest of the state.
I’ve digressed, but I’m not sure where. This comes up because William Briggs had a post on an argument against the multiverse (put short, a consequence of some interpretations of quantum mechanics). I’m a big nerd when it comes to physics. But I’m troubled by the state of that science today. Loop quantum gravity or string theory, all the proponents sound like wizards to me. There are over a dozen different interpretations of quantum mechanics.

To the uninitiated, it would all sound fantastic, especially because there is no apparent way to prove what they are saying is true, even the more simple concepts. Who has a double slit experiment they can just whip out to demonstrate wave particle duality? How about a 280 character explanation of the measurement problem? Such things do not exist.

I think the problem of magicianship in physics is simply a sign they do not really understand quantum mechanics, and so they do not have an actual theory yet, and are floundering about in a sea of possible interpretations.

We likely need to wait for the next Einstein or Heisenberg to come along and sort it out (it might be a while…Newton’s Principia to Einstein’s general relativity took 219 years). But magicianship in law…that’s a problem. Law is supposed to be based in reality. Gather the facts, ascertain the issues, determine the applicable law, apply, and provide a conclusion. Rinse and repeat as needed on appeal. But what I see is predetermined conclusion…twist facts, issues and laws to accommodate.

Cantandum in Ezkhaton 03/24/19

I’m on the road and finishing this by mobile phone. Feedly was not behaving well with WordPress, so if any of the links are broken do me a favour and let me know by comment.

Malcolm starts the week, writing on support for nuclear energy — Renewable Energy: Fraud and Folly. Followed by a model of the world economy, based on migration restrictions. Plus, two takes on the Christchurch shootings, here and the other here.

Clarissa notes an NR article on parents using their children for political expression. In my practice, I’ve worked with lots of millennial students who are gifted and smart (the LSAT selects for that). They are all great kids. But they’ve got no ‘adulting’ skills. They avoid conflict like it was a school bus full of plague infested fleas. It’s clear the adults in their lives prepared them not at all to deal with real people in conflict. I suspect their parents wanted them to remain children (the article posits a reason for this). I think it’s a leading cause of why so many (50%ish) leave Law within 5 years. My posts last year on Law School Lessons not Taught were a first try to coherently explain what new law students need to learn, besides what’s on the syllabus, in the face of bad ‘adulting’ lessons.

The Orthosphere with an inspiring interpretation of Edmund Spencer’s The Faerie Queen.

VDH on Presidents he would not vote for.

PA blog on Trump’s Numbers. Also, Two Fine Things, with one being braids on the ladies. Just under the wire, Part I of Two Nightsongs.

Alf on the Fear in the Eyes of the Elite. Also, what is the Right, and how does it best deal with the left.

Audacious Epigone on religious service attendance and happiness.

Missed from last week: Guillaume Durocher on woke immigration policy in Italy. Well worth an RTWT.

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Triumph of St. Thomas Aquinas over Averroes, Benozzo Gozzoli

Mr. Briggs starts the week with the ongoing translation of Summa Contra Gentiles, his Summary Against Modern Thought: God and Natural Effects. Also, when is a theory true? On the usefulness of trolley-car thought experiments in the Power To Kill Without Detection. He speaks on a distinction I did not appreciate before: There Are No Such Thing As Gays (Or Trannies). Ask not for whom the bell tolls. It tolls for Statistical Significance. Plus, a failed argument against free will. To finish his busy week: This Week In Doom – We Are All Seattle Now Edition.

A troubling report from a survivor of the non-binary trans-gender industry.

Steve Sailer on the anti-Semitism in the Enlightenment.

The Scholar’s Stage on Tolkien’s Heroes.

The Agenda is becoming clear (courtesy of Clarissa): on sovereignty, Part I and Part II, and on terrorism; further, on the One Party System, here and continued here.

In Canada, the Left eating its own devolves to cowbirding.

Spandrel on Acceleration by Yang. Please RTWT.

Evolutionist X on instinctual spring cleaning. Thoughts on the purpose of music: Feel Something (or someone). Also, on tribalism as a really ancient anti-predation mechanism.

“Bad” Billy Pratt at Kill to Party with Chasing Ghosts. The quote that matters: “The world has moved beyond sincerity.” Mein Herz Brennt.

Anatoly Karlin on Kazakhstan and Nazarbayev’s resignation. Not a bad article on how to implement nationalism. Also, excellent comment (#37) courtesy of the same:

I have often thought that Hitler was a strange psycho character who was out of place in his time. He was a vegetarian, fanatically committed to recycling, with an ambiguous gender identity, no kids, and he really hated Russia. Today he would fit right in with the liberal progressives marching around and yelling about the coming end of the world and how Russia has to be destroyed. Timing in life is everything, today’s Hitler might chain himself to a power plant to stop global warming, storm a farm that ‘abuses’ animals, change his gender at will, and – of course – start a war with Russia.

American Sun on American historiography of Russia. On why some massacres have more staying power than others. Foucault viewed from the Right. Also, a great article: Flight 98 Redux. A taste:

Most people would likely shake their heads at this point and argue that I am being dramatic, that things are not really that bad. America is wealthy and people are relatively safe. If such metrics are the measure of the goodness or badness of a nation, then I would not disagree. On the other hand, I flatly reject these stipulations. In fact, the measures used to gauge America’s modern success (GDP, market stability, inflation rate, employment rate) are merely the factors needed to maintain an economy of scale. We have all been convinced over time that spreadsheet economics is the measure of national health. So long as the average citizen gets a marginal crumb of the year over year growth, then the political climate will remain relatively stable.

Finishing the week: Five Friday Reads.

The Anti-Gnostic with an interesting post on the lack of scarcity and current politics.

Throne, Altar, Liberty on why you should repent for your good deeds. Bonus entry: What Came First, Gospel or Law?

Under ‘One I’ve Been Saving’ or ‘When YouTube Recommendations Actually Pay Off’: A great video from Sir Roger Scruton and the BBC on Why Beauty Matters.
Also, a highly recommended deep dive on the subject:

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Z-Man on the lie of democracy. His take on Esoteric Political Language. The Future of Media, which in Canada is heading towards appeasing [The Current Year] Party to survive. Plus, new technology, same old Oligopoly.

Also, politics as drama. I have to agree. From my perch here it seems as if the Left v. Right distinction is artificial and the outcomes of their battles largely determined. I say this because in my current career, I’ve noticed politics heats up whenever kids are in school. The moment the masses have time off, political controversies cease. I do understand that the politicians are also away, so there is little going on that might cause controversy. But a total vacuum? I strongly suspect that such controversies are reported because someone needs it to sell a story or papers, or get clicks. Such stories are not in demand during vacation/holiday times, so they don’t get made. The controversies are left in inventory for another market cycle. I already know such stories are selected to support a narrative. But I also feel like someone is metering the release of such stories so it keeps enough attention focused on the producers to maximize profits. In short, we get a supply of political conflict stories to keep us glued to the screen. I’m speaking of Canada here. Not sure if my readers notice the same.

Lastly, America, take a bow. Thanks, you make this possible after the worst winter in forty years:

Keep on reactin’ too.

Señor Blanco

Cantandum in Ezkhaton 03/17/19

I keep trying to write a quick one or two paragraphs on a weekly event to start off these posts. They’ve all been blossoming into their own posts. I think that is a good sign. I’ll be on the road for most of next week. I’m going to try and post using only my smartphone. We’ll see how it works out. (This might cause me to buy a tablet to make posting easier. Thoughts on which to buy? I’ve recently switched to Samsung Galaxy and thinking about a Samsung tablet.)

When did “asylum seeker” appear in US culture? Audacious Epigone has your answer. In Canada, it was [the Current Year], when Justin Le Premier let all those Syrian refugees in. My son and I discussed this a while ago, and he said that this might have been something Le Dauphin has done that actually helps those vulnerable groups he’s always catechizing about. How are they doing these days? Not so well, it seems.

Victor Davis Hanson on the War Against the Dead, largely fought by destroying reminders of the past.

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Orthosphere has a really good essay on the Anthropology of Martian Romance: Part I and Part II. Also, on the usefulness of ‘talkers’, and a follow-up comment on not useful talkers. A great commentary on the problems with inclusivity statements and policies. On the various iterations of the right, including the CTRL-ALT-DEL Right.

Horrorterror!!! Malcom on Climate ChangeTM getting very scary. Further, on the man who has not grovelled. Why you should support Tucker Carlson. Filed under “Weren’t they supposed to learn to code already?”, Air be raycis! But don’t worry, Michigan is cracking down on wrongthink hate crimes, with help from the SPLC! Also, his take on the Christchurch massacre.

Audacious Epigone on marriage as bliss. Also, a quick lesson by example on what Blue Checkmarks and Frontlashing mean, in the Christchurch massacre context.

Alf on Anger.

American Sun with an introduction to Andrew Yang, candidate for President. A very interesting Five Friday Reads. Henry Delacroix on what it’s like at the Arnold Classic lifting festival. A thoughtful essay and review of Guillaume Faye’s Archeofuturism: European Visions of the Post-catastrophic Age. A taste:

The system is not broken, or the result of an evil cabal of elites – it is robust, and working precisely as it is meant to run. It is driven by the worst intents of all humanity, which is, at its beating heart, made up of people who imagine themselves to be individuals, and therefore given to doing harm to one another and multiplying evil for themselves. Modernity enables this tendency rather than controlling and suppressing it, as all traditional societies have done throughout the ages. Western Civilization has surrendered itself, it has not been conquered, and it is therefore the struggle against the weakness of the West which is the paramount struggle of the contemporary Dissident – a lesson Western Dissidents seem resolutely opposed to learning.

Plus,

This is a trap of the modern Faye seems unable to escape: that the superior can cease to be superior if they are deprived of their responsibility to the inferior; to breed men like cattle may produce the best genetic specimens, but without a spiritual goal, a higher purpose, provided by the care of the noblesse oblige of the aristocrat, one is left with a race of Eloi, a sham aristocracy, afflicted with its own sort of debilitating equality. Especially lacking the wisdom of a morality, one will find the result of the best eugenic project to be something slightly less than human.

From our Statistician to the Stars: this week’s installment of the continuing Summary Against Modern Thought. Mr. Briggs on upcoming changes in use of statistical significance. Ianto Watt’s Orthodoxy’s War: Part III. USA as a declared Catholic Nation State. A funny bit on men LARPing. Also, Mr. Brigg’s reads my mind! Finally, This Week In Doom.

Anatoly Karlin on the movement of the Overton window. Plus, what makes a bad investment. Also, giving college admissions a bloody nose. How Mussolini did nothing wrong.

Evolutionist X on Why People Believe in Conspiracy Theories, and why some are more equal than others. Also, how people are using ‘Social Construct’ incorrectly. What ‘Heritable’ actually means (well worth your time).

Courtesy of Clarissa, Budweiser gets woke. No wonder it is often cited as the most popular beer up here.

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Mormon Temple. Salt Lake City, Utah

History of Mormonism on Social Matter. (Links to Social Matter have been shaky of late. Wait a few minutes and try again if you get the database error.)

Lord Black of Crossharbour on Pelsosi’s recent surrender on the Trump ‘investigation’.

PA Blog on it takes three to start a movement. Also, his take on ethnic differences worth honouring in Micronations. Plus, time for a detox.

Word on Fire blog on Jordan Peterson and the Cross.

Keep on reactin’

Señor Blanco

Christchurch

In case you have been blissfully away from the media, you’re aware of a mosque shooting in Christchurch, New Zealand. I visited Christchurch years ago. It’s lovely. But like everything else of beauty in the west, it is being wasted in the name of ideology.

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It might be Yggdrasil. Christchurch Botanical Gardens.

Here is one Canadian media’s take if you want to go down the rabbit hole. Note how finding out the actual facts of the incident requires wading through many articles, most of which deal with “viewpoints” or “condemnations” or the next round of useless government action, by controlling guns or social media. It is this sideshow that insures more of this will happen, not less.

Should I get contrite at this point because I’m not expressing the Ministry of Love’s sanctioned two-minutes of outrage? Should I say “it is a tragedy that so many lost their lives…blah f—ing blah”. Of course it’s a tragedy. Regardless of whether I like their religion I can understand that the people who were killed died brutally and the survivors and families must be in anguish.

I think the best explanation I saw came from Ramzpaul. I hope I’m not totally riffing off of him. I’ll say this: a primary purpose of a government is to provide a secure nation. When you start getting truck attacks, or mosque shootings, or other such acts (which if between nation states, would be war), then your government is clearly failing at doing its most basic job. Western democracies are failing to understand this basic premise.

We now have very different peoples living within one ostensible nation. Differences in culture cause friction, and the violence erupts. If you are a student of history at all, there are no surprises here. Western “democracies” now have a rote formula: condemn the attack, pretend we are better than that, and pass more laws and take more control over everyone’s life. All they are doing is tightening the lid on a pressure cooker. Eventually, explosions will happen.

 

Gratitude

I have a gratitude practice. Everyday, I pause for a moment and think about what I am grateful for. Some days it’s easy: my cat, my girlfriend, or the Grímnismál, for instance. Other days, it’s deeper: overcoming anxiety, the example of Christ on the Cross, or my seemingly inherent and innate purpose – to advance in confidence and faith towards the terrifying unknown.

Today I am grateful I have never had to see something like the caption below. You’ll understand why I get grouchy when similar forces start to appear in my country, or in my friends’ country to the south.

It was nearly noon, perhaps in November 1975, when my brothers, sisters, Mak, and I, among hundreds of other people, arrived at a place near Peth Preahneth Preah. It was a large, open ground studded with tall trees shielding us from the blazing heat of the day. Men, women, and children were gathered to witness a judgment on two people. Their crime, Angka said, was loving each other without Angka’s permission. Thus they were our enemies.

 

“When Angka catches enemies,” a leader had announced in the previous mandatory meeting, “Angka doesn’t keep them, Angka destroys them.”

 

One by one, the children, are picked from the crowd and told to stand near the two poles so they can see what Angka will do. It sounds as if we are about to see a play, an entertainment.

 

To the right of the poles are three wooden tables aligned from edge to edge to form one long table. Behind them, sitting on chairs, are Khmer Rouge dressed in black uniforms, perhaps in their forties and fifties, whom I have never seen before. Their necks, as usual, are decked out with red-and-white-and white-and-blue-checked scarves, draped over their shirts. They are well guarded by cadres standing with rifles behind and beside them. The cadres’ faces are grave. They stand still, straight like the poles. A few Khmer Rouge at the table whisper among themselves. At that moment I see a stash of spades, hoes, and shovels leaning against a pole planted firmly in the ground.

 

A one-horse buggy pulls up. Two cadres stride toward it. A blindfolded man, hands tied behind his back, is guided off it. Behind him emerges a blindfolded woman who is helped out of the buggy by another cadre. Her hands, too, are tied behind her back. Her stomach bulges out. Immediately she is tied to the pole near the buggy. Her arms first, then her ankles, with a rope about half the size of my wrist.

 

A woman in the crowd whispers, alarmed, “God, she’s pregnant.”

 

The blindfolded man’s arms are also bound to the pole. He’s calm, standing straight as his ankles are fastened to the bottom of the pole. Dressed in slacklike pants and a flannel shirt with long sleeves rolled up to his elbows, this man appears intelligent. He’s tall. His body build suggests he’s one of the “city people.” Like him, the pregnant woman looks smart, educated from the way she carries herself. She looks composed. Her collarless blouse with short sleeves reveals her smooth arms. Her once-refined face suggests a once-sheltered life.

 

Each of the Khmer Rouge rises from the table to speak. Their voices are fierce, full of hatred and anger as they denounce the couple. “These comrades have betrayed Angka. They’ve set a bad example. Therefore they need to be eradicated. Angka must wipe out this kind of people.”

 

Abruptly another Khmer Rouge at the table gets up, pulls the chair out of his way, strides to the front of the table, picks up a hoe, and tests its weight. Then he puts it back, lifts up a long, silver-colored spade, and tests its weight. He walks up to the blindfolded man.

 

“Bend your head now!” he commands, then raises the spade in the air.

 

The man obeys, lowering his head. The Khmer Rouge strikes the nape of his neck again and again. His body slumps, his knees sag. A muffled sound comes out of his mouth. His lover turns her head. The executioner strikes the man’s nape again. His body droops. The executioner scurries over to the pregnant woman. “Bend your head NOW!”

 

Her head bends. The spade strikes her nape. Her body becomes limp. No sound comes out of her mouth. Only two blows and she’s dead. The executioner walks away, his hand wiping the perspiration from his forehead. Suddenly a long choking sound is heard. The woman’s stomach moves, struggling. Everyone turns. Someone whispers that the baby is dying.

 

Oh…a cry from the crowd. The executioner runs back and strikes the body repeatedly until the struggle in it stops, still like the pole.

 

This was a brutal lesson. By now I know the Khmer Rouge’s dark side. I fear for Ra for avoiding Na, a defiant act against Angka. I am afraid her silent rebellion will carry a heavy price.

Ostracization

I’ve been thinking about Andrew Scheer and the dust-up around his less than instantaneous condemnation of a man who mentioned Pizzagate in a question to him last week. (Put short, the questioner mentioned Pizzagate, and Mr. Scheer did not immediately CONDEMN him for spreading such VICIOUS LIES!) I have a theory as a result.

All this virtue signaling and policing of language is not Progressives creating an ‘in group’. It’s about determining who should be ostracized. Not inclusion…exclusion. That’s why there is no antonym to ‘racist’, ‘homophobe’, ‘misogynist’ or any other term they slap on any heretic. To be labelled one or more of them is to be branded for out-group treatment, ultimately, ostracization (these days, a form of exile but within your own nation, where you lose your job, are publicly shamed, and made to recant).

It’s worse these days as no one is at the reigns of what will get you ostracized. And so we have the current out of control purity spirals where the definition of the above terms expands with every perceived offence. (At least in the past, you could count on a good religion to set some limits on what got you exiled or burned at the stake.) Heck, it’s almost like not engaging in holiness spirals is itself a ground for ostracization.

Am I condemned because I don’t care that some guy says ‘Pizzagate’? Or am I condemned because I don’t show the appropriate offence at what someone else has labelled as ‘outgroup’ identification language?

Cantandum in Ezkhaton 03/10/19

I got no big lead up this week. (I had two in the queue, but they ended up as blog posts on their own.) Let’s jump right in.

The most striking difference between ancient and modern sophists is that the ancients were satisfied with a passing victory of the argument at the expense of truth, whereas the moderns want a more lasting victory at the expense of reality. In other words, one destroyed the dignity of human thought whereas the others destroy the dignity of human action.

Hannah Arendt

Clarissa on the border crisis and how America might just be a communist nation. Malcolm with an analysis on that theme:

In China, the government has put in place a “social credit” system that tracks every citizen’s life in granular detail, and examines it for conformance to political and cultural guidelines. A low score is to be punished by, among other things, blacklisting for jobs and bank-loans, restrictions on travel, and public shaming. How is any of this different, except perhaps quantitatively, from what is happening in America and the West? The consequences are the same: express forbidden opinions, and you can lose your job, your social-media accounts, and your access to banking and financial services. The social-credit system in China is overseen by a group called the Central Commission for Comprehensively Deepening Reforms. Would this not be a terrifyingly accurate title for what the new Democratic Party, in conjunction with media and academia, have become?

Audacious Epigone on Trump approval generally based on age and race. Also, free speech versus hate speech over time.

Aidan Maclear on Monogamy is not Socialism. Plus, a brief history and discussion of Nationalism.

VDH on the left eating itself.

Malcolm is back with a combo Ireland travel/second US civil war guide. Plus, Left=Entropy.

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Guido Reni – St. Michael Archangel – 1636.

The Orthosphere on America’s actual credo. In time for International Women’s Day: The Most Monstrous Empire of All. A fun and well timed cynical carol to sing during Lent. Maybe it’s an inside joke I don’t get, or just toilet humour.

American Sun on the power of narrative framing in asymmetrical warfare.  Also, their guide to Lifting – Part I. An interesting look at Weaponizing Generated Content.  Further, an aptly titled exploration of Robin DiAngelo’s White Fragility A very interesting Fimm Föstudagar Lesa.

PA Blog on the latest attempt to rewrite history: Tarbrushing. Also, you just have to watch this one.

Anti-Gnostic discusses the Ecumenical Patriarch doubling down.

Jim on the Reactionary Program.

Heartiste’s tribute to the tough and strong on Women’s Day.

Posted under ‘Oldie but Goodie’: an interview with Twitter superstar ‘Woke Capital’. Find the ‘Woke Capital’ account here.

Anatoly Karlin on more cracks in the Convergence Theory narrative.

Throne, Altar, Liberty on ancient heresies made modern.

Scholar’s Stage on Just how Totalitarian is China? To quote:

The point here is not the level of violence and terror the average person is exposed to (though that is often a sign of the deeper issue I am addressing). Rather, what we see in this story is a frightening extension of what sort decisions are considered political. Under the Khmer Rouge, making love was an explicitly political act. Marriage was a political decision. Refusing to sleep with your husband was an act of political rebellion. The first claim of the totalitarian is that everything is political.

Definitely RTWT. Part I is here.

William Briggs begins the week with the continuing Summary Against Modern Thought. On the False Ontology of racist and other nasty names. Never mind animal rights, what are you doing about the suffering of lakes! A Climate ChangeTM paper so depressing it sends people to therapy. On the most effective advertising  (something about appealing to humans as they are). This Week In Doom on Amazon’s virtual book burning.

Evolutionist X on What Terrorists Read and Tech Company Wage Suppression. Similarities in situation between Trump and Czar Nicholas II. And of course, Captain Marvel is better than Alita: Battle Angel:

So much of what passes for modern “politics” is this mere sound and fury; tempests in teapots over great big nothings. I don’t even want to comment on much of it, because it is so pathetic (I just happen to have a strong emotional attachment to Alita, which even I find a bit curious.) The things that pass for “politics” in our modern world are so detached from reality I can’t help but wonder if we are all just being fed bread and circuses to keep us distracted from the things we ought to be doing.

Alf on videogames as a bellwether for a generation’s perspective on the world.

Lord Black of Crossharbour reviews the goings on in the Dominion’s scandalous SNC Lavalin affair. Plus, somehow, in the land of Alinsky, Chicago swerves more Left.

My son and I went to see Clutch this week. Those guys are so much fun! Neil Fallon for President!

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I know what you’re thinking sister…X-RAY VISIONS!

They’ve already got your children. A counsel of high school students in Powell River, B.C. ask to have ‘Men Working’ signs changed to remove gender specific references. You know, because they “lack accountability for the women working at the site but they also add to the stigma of women’s roles in the trade industry”. (What the hell are they talking about? How can a sign lack accountability?)

I remember once someone on the Left denying that they politicize everything. When you’ve taken high school kids to the point where they would rather identify incidents of Wrongspeak than worry about teenage things (grades, friends, sex, the future and all that other developmental stuff), what’s left to politicize?

Can we let kids be kids? Can we acknowledge the ‘Men Working’ sign is not a statement of gender dynamics but to promote caution around a road crew? Nope and nope. It’s really too bad. I thought Powell River would be a nice place to retire, in part because it’s remote enough it might avoid the insanity of Progressivism. And, you need at least one ferry ride to get there, which makes the place somewhat zombie apocalypse proof.

Keep on reactin’

Señor Blanco

 

Democracy, eh.

The SNC Lavalin affair has led me to think about democracy in Canada. I’m lightweight on this kind of stuff, but this needs to come out.

We do not have rule by the people in Canada, otherwise called ‘democracy’ ( ‘δεμοσ’ – the people; and ‘κρατια‘ – power, rule.)

Look at any election in Canada. The ‘δεμοσ’ are not calling the shots. Justin Trudeau himself was re-elected as the Member of Parliament for Papineau in [the Current Year], with 51.98% of the votes cast in his riding. This was 26,931 votes, out of 78,515 electors, in a riding with 110,750 people. That means 34.3% of potential voters selected him. Those who did not vote are deemed acquiescent to the decisions of his government. The ones who did vote for him are also deemed to agree with all decisions made by the government. The rest…meh.

Nationwide, [the Current Year] vote was 39.47% for liberals, with a turn out of 58.8%. So, 23.21% percent of voters actually voted Liberal. And for that, everything the Liberals do is now deemed to be what the ‘δεμοσ’ wants. That’s great! They get to do whatever they want and blame it on us. And if they screw up, they get punished by losing power and getting high paying jobs in the private sector. They do not even have to fix their mistakes. Sweet deal.

Further, the decisions made in Ottawa by the bureaucracy are also deemed to be ‘δεμοσ’ endorsed. If you don’t like it, complain all you like. The odds of you voting in politicians who will change what you don’t like is nominal. You’ll likely forget by the next election.

What Canada actually has is rule by an aristocracy. A member of the aristocracy, SNC Lavalin, demands the law be changed and applied in their favour. The ‘δεμοσ’ need not opine.

Justin Trudeau, another aristocrat, happens to have the job of convincing the ‘δεμοσ’ this is what they wanted all along (saving jobs of course…maybe…well, the right kind of jobs…in a province that matters.)

So, democracy is not the right to have your voice heard in politics. Your choice is to vote for who feeds you the propaganda that what was decided in Ottawa (which may be hundreds if not thousands of kilometers away) was actually what you wanted.

All this business about Justice Committee hearings and Minister resignations is not about accountability to the ‘δεμοσ’. It’s about deciding which narrative gets fed to the ‘δεμοσ’ about decisions which are largely made by unelected bureaucrats.

I’d be slightly less grumpy if I could say that Canadian democracy at least gets the aristocracy to play by a set of rules, and to play nice with the common folk. But it does not. It’s about getting the common folk to believe they created rules which make them subservient to the aristocracy. I suppose it’s ‘same old, same old’. And the inevitable conclusion is that nothing about an SNC Lavalin level scandal is going to bring down an aristocrat like Trudeau until the aristocrats want it to.

Cantandum in Ezkhaton 03/03/19

Victor Davis Hanson on the Jussie Smollett hoax and shit-show: a symptom of the times. Heartiste on the frequency of hate hoaxes. The Orthosphere has a quick litmus test for such hoaxes. Audacious Epigone notes it is a ‘peak hoax’, at least for now.

Lord Black of Crossharbour on the hoax of Trump – Russia connections. Also, Audacious Epigone briefly looks at some family tensions around Trump.

WaPo finally admits it got the Covington Smirkgate wrong. When it takes a Statement of Claim to convince you to remove outright lies from circulation, you are following your insurer’s instructions, not the truth. (I’m not linking to the WaPo: if democracy is dying in the darkness…they are the darkness.)

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Courtesy of JayMan’s Blog

I don’t understand the United States of America as much as I’d like. But I can see from my perch in Alberta that a cultural divide is causing a tonne of friction, and this is playing out in the articles linked above. The primary way in which these cultures are fighting it out is through that very media, although it’s spilling over into actions, which include the hoaxes, but may also get more violent over time.

I’m relying on my limited sense of how things unfolded in the transition from Weimar Republic to Third Reich. But without the technology to record and disseminate what actually happens in these hoaxes, any one of the hoax situations above is a potential Reichstag Fire for the Progressive Left. Indeed, the Left in the US seems to be LOOKING for its Reichstag Fire: confirmation that its twisted narrative can be confirmed by manufacturing reality around an event. If that’s true, will YouTube, the Tweets, blogging and instant posting of video footage be enough to stop it? I hope so.

(You may argue that those events are also potential Reichstag fires for the right as well. Notice any any attempts by the right to reduce the US to totalitarianism as a result of those events? No, I didn’t think so. Notice any by the left? Uh-huh.)

Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus at NeoCiceronian Times on why the left cannot meme, and how to use this against them.

Scholar’s Stage talks about the real purpose of your reasoning brain – strength in your position.

Anatoly Karlin on Statecraft at work in Venezuela.

Audacious Epigone on Republican support for Trump.

Dr. Spencer on 99.99997% certainty in Climate ChangeTM meaning nothing, actually.

William Briggs starts off the week with his Summary Against Modern Thought. Followed up with Heaven & Hell Are Real. On the ability of AI to explain religious conflict (spoiler: it’s not). Guest post by Ianto Watt: Orthodoxy’s War Part I. Our Statistician to the Stars agrees: Probability is not as Easy as You Think! A classic post on The Magician and the Cardsharp. Closing the week off: The Week In Doom. Related: British Columbia will help your 14 year old transition for free…whether you like it or not.

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New and improved non-sexist formula!

Now that the draft will apply to women in the US (who are barely into adulthood at the required age), the Orthosphere declares objections to such absurdity. Also, on Werewolves.

Part 2 of the American Sun analysis of the Smirk Seen Round the World:

Slavov Zizek offers a fresher perspective, unlike the usual lazy responses produced by Conservatism™ media people and the “Intellectual” Dark Web liberals. He states that this is not some conspiracy by post-modernists and Marxists to subvert western society. Instead this widely enforced cultural orthodoxy is enforced by liberalism, it is liberalism’s last attempt to legitimize the flattening of all cultures. There is (in actuality) a sophisticated patronization and control of minority subaltern groups by liberalism. It is the dream of a global liberal order that smashed cultures together, destroyed cultural identities among diverse people, and flattened the diverse cultural norms of societies to begin with. In the current politically correct regime, it is not the celebration of difference, but rather a celebration of homogenization in modern liberal societies.

Also from American Sun, threats to the American Empire.  Double quote this week, with the following from Penance as Social Technology:

One of the great benefits the culture of penance provided was protection against destructive status seeking.  In Neo-Reactionary thinking, this is most frequently discussed in terms of “holiness spirals,” which is actually a specific case of a more general phenomenon: a characteristic of Modernity is individuals pursuing religious ideas, religious feelings, and religious beliefs based on their own personal reactions and experience.  Each seeks to outdo the others, asking “am I not also a prophet?”

American Sun finishes the week with Five Friday Reads.

Clarissa on California’s special effort to separate students from their history. Plus, her very quick summary of Michael Cohen’s testimony before Congress.

Rethink Campaigns on the unknown Winston Smith, still alive and kicking, working for the Ministry of Truth, Oil Sands Division. Also, it’s not enough to stab them, you have to twist the knife too.

Evolutionist X on why child rearing gets easier when you have more children. Does the DSM need to be rewritten? And, Tribalism, for good or ill?

PA Blog discusses Snapshots for a Chinese Century (NSFW, but these days, what is?).

From Razib Khan, who has been pushed too far by snowflakes. I don’t think he’s kidding.

 

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A controversial but apt description of goings on last week in Canada.

In Canuckistan, the Wilson-Raybould / SNC Lavalin scandal blew up. If former Justice Minister Ms. Wilson-Raybould’s testimony is correct, the Liberals engaged in backroom arm twisting to help SNC Lavalin avoid criminal charges of bribing foreign officials, including paying for escorts for Muammar Gaddafi‘s son while in Canada.

Prime Minister Trudeau allegedly pressured Canada’s then Minister of Justice to enter into a Deferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA) which would see SNC Lavalin avoid criminal charges. She said “no”, and Trudeau, his Cabinet, his staff, and the Clerk of Canada’s Privy Council, ever the raging feminists, thought she meant “try harder”.

Trudeau now actually appears to be nothing more than a cynic, using sunny progressive ways to obtain power, and his staff and government are starting to look like thugs and bullies. Nothing new from the left, and especially from a Prime Minister who loves Castro, and who expressed admiration for China’s dictatorship. Although, Trudeau is also very weak and it’s possible lobbyists for SNC Lavalin simply exploited him. (Something about Occam’s razor and not attributing to malice what is simply stupidity.)

Stefan Molyneaux has a very long but excellent summary here. The only thing I can offer is that this is politics. Canadians may not want to admit it, but I’m sure such political dealings go on all the time. Justin Trudeau held himself out as transparent, woke and progressive, but turned out to be none of those things, playing the very games he accused others of. What is galling is perhaps not that he engaged in these kinds of politics, but that he did it for little to no gain, while throwing his former Justice Minister, his chief advisor, and all his sacred principles, under the bus. His style of leadership reminds me of a toddler in a high chair throwing everything on the ground when he does not get his way. Those of us who were not infected by the latest iteration of Trudeaumania saw this right out of the gate in [The Current Year].

After watching Jody’s testimony, I think she is being sincere. Further, I think she knew early on that the efforts by the Prime Minister to keep SNC Lavalin from prosecution for bribing Libyan officials was not going to end until a DPA was done. I trust her when she says she kept records of all conversations: she is a lawyer and keeping copious records (especially when your client is likely to ignore you and do something illegal) is an inherent self-preservation mechanism.

The Prime Minister’s response was surprising. (Here’s a partisan review of his body language, good for a laugh.) He looks like a guilty little boy with his hand caught in the cookie jar. He’s in trouble and he knows it. It’s nice to see him squirm when all his life he seems to have never had to suffer the consequences of his actions. I watched his father commit economic rapine against my province in the early 1980s. I now see Justin trying the same thing: wreck the livelihoods of millions of Albertans to get some votes in Central Canada (and this time, the Left Coast). Trudeau delenda est.

Keep on reactin’!

Señor Blanco